Humans must merge with machines or become irrelevant in AI age.
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THE FUTURE? I’ll SEE YOU THERE…

Humans must merge with machines or become irrelevant in AI age.

Neuralink’s plan to merge humans with machines is aimed at stopping a “terminator”-style scenario.

Neuralink is developing ultra high bandwidth brain-machine interfaces to connect humans and computers.

We are looking for exceptional engineers and scientists. No neuroscience experience is required: talent and drive matter far more. We expect most of our team to come from other areas and industries.

We are primarily looking for evidence of exceptional ability and a track record of building things that work.

https://www.neuralink.com/

For those who missed it, here is one of the best film about the life of Nikola Tesla.

The Secret of Nikola Tesla (Serbo-Croatian: Tajna Nikole Tesle), is a 1980 Yugoslav biographical film which details events in the life of the discoverer Nikola Tesla (portrayed by Serbian actor Petar Božović). Tesla was born to ethnic Serb parents in 1856 Croatia (at the time, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire). He arrived in New York in 1884, became an American citizen in 1891, made immense contributions to science and died in Manhattan at age 86 during World War II in 1943.[1]

This biography includes references to his amazing abilities of detailed mental visualization as well as the slowly intensifying personal habits, indulgences or eccentricities for which he became nearly as well known. The film portrays Tesla in a battle with Thomas Edison over the clear superiority of Alternating Current over Direct Current. It also depicts Tesla’s dream of supplying consumers all around the globe with limitless free energy.

Croatian director Krsto Papić assembled a cast which includes three American actors playing iconic personalities of 19th and early 20th century America, J. P. Morgan (1837–1913), Thomas Edison (1847–1931) and George Westinghouse (1846–1914). Morgan is portrayed by Orson Welles, while Croatian actress Oja Kodar, Welles’ companion for the last 24 years of his life, has the role of Katharine Johnson (1855–1924), with whom Tesla corresponded for many years, and whose husband, Robert Underwood Johnson (1853–1937) (portrayed by Croatian actor Boris Buzančić) was a poet, scholar, diplomat and Tesla’s longtime friend and supporter. The other Americans in the cast are character actors Strother Martin (who died six weeks before the film’s September 12, 1980 English-language premiere at the Toronto Festival of Festivals) and Dennis Patrick as Westinghouse and Edison, respectively.[2]
Enjoy

 

Time – July 23rd, 1934

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He has produced nothing tangible for a long time, but he still remains one of the foremost living inventors of electrical apparatus. His day comes once a year. On his birthday Manhattan newshawks seek him out in some hotel, listen closely to his words. Wearing an outmoded brown suit, he received the Press one day last week in a Hotel New Yorker reception room. That day Nikola Tesla was 78.

The first thing Nikola Tesla invented was a hook for catching frogs. That was not long after he learned to talk, in the Croatian hamlet of Smiljan where he was born. He studied physics and mathematics at two universities, got into telegraph engineering, went to Budapest, to Paris, to the U. S. in 1884 to work for Thomas Edison. Soon he had a research laboratory of his own. Four years later he patented the induction motor, first effective utilization of alternating current. He discovered the rotary magnetic field principle used today in the hydroelectric plants at Niagara Falls. He invented dynamos, transformers, induction coils, condensers, arc and incandescent lamps. He was acclaimed a great genius.

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In 1898, Tesla demonstrated a radio-controlled boat—which he dubbed “teleautomaton”—to the public during an electrical exhibition at Madison Square Garden. The crowd that witnessed the demonstration made outrageous claims about the workings of the boat, such as magic, telepathy, and being piloted by a trained monkey hidden inside. Tesla tried to sell his idea to the U.S. military as a type of radio-controlled torpedo, but they showed little interest. Remote radio control remained a novelty until World War I and afterward, when a number of countries used it in military programs.

Tesla took the opportunity to further demonstrate “Teleautomatics” in an address to a meeting of the Commercial Club in Chicago, while he was travelling to Colorado Springs, on 13 May 1899.

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